Colour Vs Black & White

Remember I went to Beningbrough Hall on 01/01/22? Well here are a few of the images but I thought you might like to see them in both colour & black and white.

I wrote an article last year on the differences between B&W and Monochrome which you will find here.

Black and white photography has unique qualities that are as strong today as they always were. Timeless, gritty, truthful and classic are all common ways of describing black-and-white photography … even after nearly 200 years since Joseph Nicéphore Niépce made the first black-and-white photograph, mono remains as popular as ever.

DIGITAL CAMERA 2020

When does winter start?

How you define the first day of winter depends on whether you are referring to the astronomical or meteorological winter.

The day in our calendar that marks the first day of winter usually refers to the astronomical seasons which are a result of the Earth’s axis and orbit around the Sun.

Astronomical winter

This year, astronomical winter begins on 21 December 2021 and ends on 20 March 2022.

8 interesting facts about winter

Whether you dread the windy weather or look forward to the crisp mornings, find out 8 interesting facts about winter.

Winter is a fascinating time of year and we’ve got 8 interesting facts about the season.

Photo by freestocks.org on Pexels.com

1. Winter is coming

There are two different dates when winter could be said to begin, depending on whether we are referring to the Meteorological or Astronomical winter.

Astronomical winter is defined by the Earth’s orbit around the Sun and begins on the winter solstice, which falls on 21 or 22 December.

However, when recording and comparing climate data, it is important to have set dates that can be compared and so for this reason a fixed date of 1 December is used to mark the start of the meteorological winter.

2. Earth is closest to the Sun in winter

You might be surprised to know that in the northern hemisphere the Earth is closest to the Sun during winter.

Around 3 January, the Earth reaches perihelion (peri meaning ‘near’ and helion meaning ‘sun’) and the Earth is 3.1 million miles closer to the Sun than at aphelion (around 5 July when the Earth is furthest from the Sun).

Earth’s distance from the Sun is not what causes the seasons but it does affect the length of them. Around perihelion, the Earth is moving around 1 kilometre per second faster than at aphelion which results in winter being 5 days shorter than summer.

Perihelion

Peri = near

Helion = sun

(metOffice web)

3. The coldest temperature recorded in winter

The coldest temperature ever recorded during a UK winter was -27.2 °C, which has been recorded 3 times. It was twice recorded in the village of Braemar, on 11 February 1895 and again on 10 January 1982, and once in Altnaharra on 30 December 1995. Both sites are in the Scottish Highlands.

4. The winter of 1963

The winter of 1963 is one of the coldest on record and the coldest since 1740. Temperatures consistently reached lower than – 20 °C with blizzards, snowdrifts and even the sea freezing around the coast.

The severe cold began just before Christmas in 1962 as a high pressure system sat to the northeast of the UK for much of the winter, dragging cold polar winds over the UK.

On 29 and 30 December, a blizzard struck the UK with snowdrifts up to 6 metres deep. Snow continued to fall frequently and until early March 1963, much of the UK remained covered in snow.

5. The roots of winter

The word winter comes from the Germanic wintar which in turn is derived from the root wed meaning ‘wet’ or water’, and so signifies a wet season.

In Anglo-Saxon cultures, years were counted by the winters, so a person could be said to be ‘2 winters old.’ The first day of winter was also of symbolic importance named Vetrardag and falling comparatively early in the year between 10 and 16 October.

6. Wet snow vs. dry snow

Ever wondered why sometimes snow sticks together and sometimes it’s powdery and loose? The reason for this lies in the snowflake’s journey as it falls through the atmosphere.

Snowflakes that fall through a dry, cool atmosphere will be small and powdery and won’t stick together. We call this dry snow – it’s ideal for skiing, but not for building a snowman.

The snowflakes that form wet snow will have fallen through temperatures slightly warmer than 0 °C. As they fall, the snowflakes melt slightly around the edges and stick together to form large, heavy flakes. These stick together easily and are the best for a snowball fight and making snowmen.

7. Reindeer vision

Some reindeer living above the Arctic Circle live in complete darkness for several weeks of the year.

To adapt to this, a small area of tissue behind the retina called the tapetum lucidum changes colour from a gold colour in summer months to blue in winter. This allows the reindeer’s eyes to detect ultraviolet light and to see in the dark.

8. How much water is there in snow?

The exact amount of water contained in snow can vary quite significantly depending on how the snow formed, but as a general average, every 12 cm of snow would provide 1 cm of water.


Snowman piano – D Peppiatt (original H Blake)

A bit of a cold spell

And that’s the first week of January completed already!What a change this week from really mild weather to freezing cold and icy. A cold ride home, my ears and cheeks felt so cold! By the end of the week we also a dusting of snow as well but nothing like some parts of the country.

No one owns the …

Just thought I would add this quote today which popped up on my timeline today – very true.

Beautiful mild day

I heard a bird sing in the dark of December. A magical thing. And sweet to remember. We are nearer to Spring than we were in September. I heard a bird sing in the dark of December.” Oliver Herford

Dull November

Dull November brings the blast; Then the leaves are whirling fast. Sarah Coleridge

Lake District Memories V

It’s Sunday so it must be visit the Lake District day! If you go to the Lakes, be prepared for every weather. All photographs are taken by SJ Butler Photography. The climate, together with the geology of the area has made the Lake District what it is today. In the last 2 million years a […]

So tired…

Well my answer is yes, I’m feeling really exhausted and I’m so ready for a few days off coming up soon. I haven’t really been out with my camera taking any Autumnal shots yet. I’m hoping that next week might have some really lovely days so that i can go out and take my camera […]

Lake District Memories IX

“The Earth is Art, The Photographer is only a Witness ”
Yann Arthus-Bertrand


It’s Sunday so it must be visit the Lake District day! The Lakes are steeped in history and mystery with some stunning caves, stones and more. This week the Lakes a few of the beautiful water falls – enjoy and have a great Sunday.

Moss Force (top right, bottom middle & right) can be found in Newlands Pass, above Buttermere village. Access to Moss Force is fairly easy as the waterfall is roughly 220 yards from the road between Keswick and Buttermere.

The falls are an impressive sight after rain as torrents of water plunge 100 meters below.

Aira Force

Aira Force is a beautiful waterfall located just off the banks of Ullswater. Park at the National Trust car park and follow the Gowbarrow Trail through the forest, passing Aira Force to reach the summit of Gowbarrow.

This famous waterfall has been a popular attraction for over 300 years, and has even been written about by the likes of William Wordsworth in his poem Airey-Force Valley

Rydal

Rydal Falls is situated just off the A591 between Ambleside and Grasmere. It is a ten minute walk from Rydal Mount, once home to the poet William Wordsworth.


Lake District Memories VII

“The Earth is Art, The Photographer is only a Witness ”
Yann Arthus-Bertrand


It’s Sunday so it must be visit the Lake District day! The Lakes are steeped in history and mystery with some stunning caves, stones and more. This week the Lakes in pastel – enjoy and have a great Sunday.

All images by Sue Butler Photography

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Goodbye October, Hello November

“October extinguished itself in a rush of howling winds and driving rain and November arrived, cold as frozen iron, with hard frosts every morning and icy drafts that bit at exposed hands and faces.”

J.K. Rowling
Short video looking at October as we say hello to November.
SJ Butler Photography

Lake District Memories VI

“The Earth is Art, The Photographer is only a Witness ”
Yann Arthus-Bertrand


It’s Sunday so it must be visit the Lake District day! The Lakes are steeped in history and mystery with some stunning caves, stones and more.

Castlerigg Stone Circle or the the Keswick Circle in the older historical sources, and its exact purpose still remains unclear, but researchers believe that it was used for ceremonial or religious purposes.

Castlerigg Stone Circle was built around 4,500 years ago in the Neolithic times.

The circle, probably once had 42 stones, now consists of 38 granite stones arranged in a circle, approximately 32.6 x 29.5 m in diameter. Within the ring is a rectangle of a further 10 standing stones. The tallest stone is 2.3 meters high. It was probably built around 3000 BC – the beginning of the later Neolithic Period.

Probably built around 3000 BC, the beginning of the later Neolithic Period,
Castlerigg Stone Circle is one of the earliest stone circles in Britain.
It is important in terms of megalithic astronomy and geometry, as the construction contains significant astronomical alignments.
Rydal caves are a must if you visit the Lakes.
Situated above Rydal Water near Buttermere
Inside Rydal Caves are stunning patterns on the rocks. Unfortunately, the caves are manmade.
Rydal Cave used to be called Loughrigg Quarry.
The Lake District is famous for its slate and, in the 19th century,
Loughrigg Fell was a Slate Mine where it would be sourced from.

All photographs are taken by SJ Butler Photography & must not be copied or reproduced without permission from SJ Butler – thank you

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Nunnington Hall

Gourd!
That’s a lot of veggies!

I had a visit to Nunnington Hall & Gardens which is owned by the National Trust. Their botanical displays were absolutely gorgeous. Here are just a few of the many, many displays. If you want to find any information about Nunnington or any of the National Trust properties/gardens please click here.

Photographs by SJ Butler

Latest Instagram posts – check out the video of the gorgeous piano playing. I will be posting that sometime this week!

Something Spooky…

…this way comes

If you are out and about in York this week take a walk through the Museum Gardens if you dare!
You will find ghosts in and around the garden. Apparently there are 10 but I only found 9!

Apparently, the City of York has gained a reputation as perhaps the most haunted city in England and it is often known somewhat affectionately as ‘the City of 1000 ghosts’.

Spooky things happening in York Museum Gardens today
I liked the squirrel ‘ghost’ the best!

Lake District Memories V

“The Earth is Art, The Photographer is only a Witness ”
Yann Arthus-Bertrand


It’s Sunday so it must be visit the Lake District day! If you go to the Lakes, be prepared for every weather. All photographs are taken by SJ Butler Photography.

Walking round Derwentwater – no rain today
Slater’s Bridge – if you look carefully at the River, you’ll see that’s it’s absolutely pouring down!

The climate, together with the geology of the area has made the Lake District what it is today.

In the last 2 million years a series of ice ages have left the area buried under glaciers.
These rivers of ice carved deep lakes & u shaped valleys between the hills.

Lake Distrct National Park


One minute it’s sunny – the next the heaven’s open

Ten highest mountains

  • Scafell Pike at 978 metres (3210 feet)
  • Scafell at 964 metres (3162 feet)
  • Helvellyn at 950 metres (3114 feet)
  • Skiddaw at 931 metres(3053 feet)
  • Great End at 910 metres (2986 feet)
  • Bowfell at 902 metres (2940 feet)
  • Great Gable at 899 metres (2960 feet)
  • Pillar at 892 metres (2926 feet)
  • Nethermost Pike at 891 metres (2923 feet)
  • Catstycam (2917 feet)



Sixteen largest lakes

  • Windermere – 14.8 square kilometres
  • Ullswater – 8.9 square kilometres
  • Derwentwater – 5.5 square kilometres
  • Bassenthwaite Lake – 5.3 square kilometres
  • Coniston Water – 4.0 square kilometres
  • Haweswater – 3.9 square kilometres
  • Thirlmere – 3.3  square kilometres
  • Ennerdale Water – 3 square kilometres

  • Wastwater – 2.9  square kilometres
  • Crummock Water – 2.5 square kilometres
  • Esthwaite Water – 1 square kilometre
  • Buttermere – 0.9 square kilometres
  • Grasmere – 0.6 square kilometres
  • Loweswater – 0.6 square kilometres
  • Rydal Water – 0.3 square kilometres
  • Brotherswater – 0.2 square kilometre

Slater’s Bridge
Soaked to the skin at this point

So tired…

Zzzzzzzzzz

Well my answer is yes, I’m feeling really exhausted and I’m so ready for a few days off coming up soon. I haven’t really been out with my camera taking any Autumnal shots yet. I’m hoping that next week might have some really lovely days so that i can go out and take my camera out again.

Copyright SJ Butler Photography

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.”

L. M. Montgomery, Anne of Green Gables