This Empty World

I happen to visit Nunnington Hall over the week and was fascinated by Layla Khoo’s installation of ‘Change in Attitudes’.
There was 5,000 ceramic horns which the visitor could either take as a ‘trophy’ or leave for others to enjoy.
I didn’t take one. The article below is taken from Nunnington Hall website and gives context to the art installation.

Messages left by visitors

Published : 12 Sep 2019

A display of 5,000 small porcelain black rhinoceros horns are on show at Nunnington Hall in North Yorkshire, each representing one of the remaining black rhinos left in the world.

To draw the parallel between the artwork and the animals in the wild, visitors will be invited to take one of the 5,000 ceramic rhino horn artworks home as a souvenir, but with the moral dilemma that each one taken cannot be replaced and will leave fewer and fewer for others to experience.

Artist Layla Khoo was invited to respond to the big game hunting trophies in the house …

Inspiration for the ceramic art installation has been taken from the black rhino horn once kept in Colonel Fife’s collection but no longer on display. 

Each piece of art aims to encourage conversation about how social acceptance of big game hunting has changed, the rise in support for wildlife conservation, and the acknowledgement that game hunting is still active.

Nunnington curator for the National Trust, Jonathan Wallis said:

“Layla’s installations provide a powerful reminder of the devastating effect of big game hunting on many,
now endangered, species and the conservation issues we
are tackling today. 

A Yorkshire-based ceramic artist, Layla Khoo said:

“Living locally to Nunnington Hall, I was already familiar with and fascinated by both the house and the collection. When the opportunity arose not only to research and respond to the taxidermy display, but to also take the opportunity to engage the public in conversations about conservation, I was eager to develop these ideas. 

“The narrative of the work evolved as I was able to explore the social and historical context of Colonel Fife’s life experiences. I was then able to contrast this with current times and attitudes towards the natural environment with the help of Flamingo Land zoo, who were able to demonstrate the impact of breeding programmes for endangered species, including black rhino. My hope is that people will come away from the installation pieces with an insight into the stories the collection tells and consider how this reflects on their own choices and current environmental issues.”

Nunnington Hall (click on the link to read the full article)

As I scrolled through Instagram I stumbled across this photographer and his work which fitted with my visited to Nunnington Hall and the exhibition. His work is amazing and very powerful.

2022 Alternative Photography april archive Autumn beningbrough hall birds blossom blue botanical butterfly cards cats Christmas cumbria cyanotypes february Flowers Gardens history lakes Landscapes macro march may memories months national trust nature Photography quote quotes SJ Butler snow Spring summer sun printing sunrise sunset travels trees video weather winter Yorkshire

Big Butterfly Count


People across the UK are being asked to take part in an annual count of butterflies amid fears they have been affected by poor weather this spring. I was only thinking the other day that I had not seen many butterflies at all in my garden or on the country lanes when I go cycling.

TV naturalist Chris Packham said participating in the Big Butterfly Count could provide key research on the impact of climate change on wildlife.

Members of the public should spend 15 minutes outside counting the number and type of butterflies they see.

The annual count will take place over the next three weeks starting today!


Packham, who is vice-president of Butterfly Conservation, said: “Biodiversity and climate crisis is an urgent issue and it can be overwhelming to think about what we can do as individuals to really make a difference.

…low numbers of speckled wood butterflies, while small tortoiseshells, commas, green-veined whites, large whites and red admirals 

Butterfly Conservation

“Because butterflies and moths make excellent indicators of the impacts of climate change and other human environmental factors, collecting data on their numbers is really important.

If you want to get involved or find out more visit these links.
You can also download a fabulous poster to help identify the butterflies and day time moths!


Last year more than 145,000 recordings were submitted to the Big Butterfly Count, but 2020 saw the lowest average number of butterflies logged since it began 12 years ago

Butterfly Conservation

2022 Alternative Photography april archive Autumn beningbrough hall birds blossom blue botanical butterfly cards cats Christmas cumbria cyanotypes february Flowers Gardens history lakes Landscapes macro march may memories months national trust nature Photography quote quotes SJ Butler snow Spring summer sun printing sunrise sunset travels trees video weather winter Yorkshire